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Euclidean Sequencing

12

It is needed in modern music, y'all can do it better. you have the tech, I love your product.

Comments

  • 1
    VJFranzKVJFranzK Los Angeles USAPosts: 120

    Music, Visuals, Reviews of Synths, Drum Machines, Apps
    YouTube: VJFranzK

  • 0
    Salamndr1Salamndr1 CaliforniaPosts: 12

    @VJFranzK said:

    hey your in LA?! I think our machine needs this, lol.

  • 1
    minigoatminigoat cincinnati ohio usaPosts: 289

    +1
    be awesome to have just in kit tracks really

  • 1
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • 1
    minigoatminigoat cincinnati ohio usaPosts: 289

    @alien_brain said:
    i think this just keeps you from developing the personality of a groove by the power of your own edit, which is based on trying and failing or refining until you get it 'there'. this is how a musician gets better imho. this would definitely appeal to a lot of people im sure. eh why not. could be interesting.

    i can see that being the case if its not pushed creatively, it becoming a cheap crutch. i can also see it as another way to build off of what your already feeling.
    Like a "jam" band or improv, drumcircle-esq way of building up rhythms and grooves. i just downloaded the java euclidean editor from: http://www.hisschemoller.com/blog/2011/euclidean-midi-patterns/
    ive found you can build up some really hypnotic grooves though. it only plots the steps and rotation, you still need to set the pitch, velocity, and duration.
    To me the art is in the -selection- of what fits the moment. nothing is really new under the sun and we all build off each other and what inspires us.
    im new to the idea of "euclidean sequencing" and +1 the idea after watching the yt video above...but now ive used that java one...i kinda think the deluge is already capable of this to an extent, with its ability to shorten track lengths? like i said, im not fully aware of what really defines this type of sequencing. Appears to just be semi-symmetrical poly rhythms?

  • 1
    IcoustikIcoustik NorwayModerator Posts: 664
    edited April 2018

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=vwigqSwYNaQ

    This video also helped me understand more of the mathematics

    Post edited by Icoustik on
  • 0
    Salamndr1Salamndr1 CaliforniaPosts: 12

    @alien_brain said:
    i think this just keeps you from developing the personality of a groove by the power of your own edit, which is based on trying and failing or refining until you get it 'there'. this is how a musician gets better imho. this would definitely appeal to a lot of people im sure. eh why not. could be interesting.

    I just think it should be an option, I love building beat's, and breaks but this just seems fun too!

  • 0
    Salamndr1Salamndr1 CaliforniaPosts: 12

    @minigoat said:

    @alien_brain said:
    i think this just keeps you from developing the personality of a groove by the power of your own edit, which is based on trying and failing or refining until you get it 'there'. this is how a musician gets better imho. this would definitely appeal to a lot of people im sure. eh why not. could be interesting.

    i can see that being the case if its not pushed creatively, it becoming a cheap crutch. i can also see it as another way to build off of what your already feeling.
    Like a "jam" band or improv, drumcircle-esq way of building up rhythms and grooves. i just downloaded the java euclidean editor from: http://www.hisschemoller.com/blog/2011/euclidean-midi-patterns/
    ive found you can build up some really hypnotic grooves though. it only plots the steps and rotation, you still need to set the pitch, velocity, and duration.
    To me the art is in the -selection- of what fits the moment. nothing is really new under the sun and we all build off each other and what inspires us.
    im new to the idea of "euclidean sequencing" and +1 the idea after watching the yt video above...but now ive used that java one...i kinda think the deluge is already capable of this to an extent, with its ability to shorten track lengths? like i said, im not fully aware of what really defines this type of sequencing. Appears to just be semi-symmetrical poly rhythms?

    I also think it would be fun to use it with multiple synths to write some weird stuff...

  • 1
    minigoatminigoat cincinnati ohio usaPosts: 289

    @Icoustik thanks for the link. so i guess the distribution maths would be the processing part for the deluge.
    you can already offset notes and change step length.
    @Salamndr1 could def get some weird going, but also some pretty nod worthy bits.

  • 0
    Salamndr1Salamndr1 CaliforniaPosts: 12

    @minigoat said:
    @Icoustik thanks for the link. so i guess the distribution maths would be the processing part for the deluge.
    you can already offset notes and change step length.
    @Salamndr1 could def get some weird going, but also some pretty nod worthy bits.

    I think our machine is just poly-rhythmic at the moment by using the formula that you provide above, I already do that, but the computer on board is pretty good, and to do a simple dance song I only be using like 8 or 9 patterns with crazy internal synths and sampling, not even scratching 8 gigs! So why not throw in the extra edge of math?

  • 0
    n00bn00b SpacePosts: 28

    Can't you achieve the same effect with turning on the 'sync-scaling' as shown in this video:

    https://youtu.be/tps_qmTq_PQ?t=12m12s

    'Bad sound kills good music!'

  • 0
    AkenAken MontrealPosts: 27

    @n00b said:
    Can't you achieve the same effect with turning on the 'sync-scaling' as shown in this video:

    https://youtu.be/tps_qmTq_PQ?t=12m12s

    No because euclidian rhythms use the current grid, i.e. if you change 16 step to 7 step it is like pushing <>+shift. The interesting thing in the euclydian algorythms is that they allow you to redistribute the filled steps in a snap.

  • 0
    LautarLautar SwitzerlandPosts: 1

    So here is the eternal question about Polyrhythmics and Polymeter.
    I'm including the Euclidean rhythms on the same confusing box. I don't have a Deluge but hope you can answer me this question. 

    So far it seems clear that Deluge can do Polymeter. Not only that, it is an electrical authority doing it. You have visual contact of all your polymeters within the 128 pads. Polymeter: different lengths for each track, these are playing in their individual loop and finally at some point they will meet together... 

    Polyrhythms is a tricky one. If Deluge can set different tempo BPM to each track, there you have polyrhythms. Now you will just need to make maths: a 3:4 polyrhythm at 30 bpm (the bar) will be achieved with a track going on at 120 bpm per beat and a second track at 90 bpm per beat. 

    For getting a 7:6 polyrhythm at the same tempo, you will need one track at 210 bpm and the second one at 180 bpm. Simple polyrhythms as 3:4, probably you can handle with the almost infinite zoom option that Deluge v3 has. But it would be very nice if you could set a different tempo per track.  (Can you do that on Deluge ???)

    Euclidean rhythms, I don't know why Deluge doesn't have this option, it seems too easy to include it into this awesome machine. if Deluge can play an horizontal sequence, let's say your kick track over 16 beats, it could play it in a circle over the pads (as the image below).
    Now it is just a matter of setup, 2 different values: the length and the n. of divisions per cycle. Anyway, you can do any euclidean rhythm in any sequencer manually, but again, Deluge seems a powerful music machine, this will set euclidean live performance to another level. 

    Thanks for your answer, if you have them, or comments.

    ps.. The image below is a Euclidean rhythm of 7 inside 12 beats. ps2.. if you don't want to do the maths for polyrhythms, there is this crazy metronome online: https://bouncemetronome.com/visual_metronome/visual_metronome_with_drum_machine.htm

  • 0
    hexagon5unhexagon5un MunichPosts: 62
    edited July 9

    Euclidean patterns are great for sequencers with very limited interfaces: you just enter 4:16 and you get beats spaced out as close to evenly as possible over the bar.

    If you want to mimic this on the Deluge: set up the loop length and then distribute the beats across it manually. You want 5:12, set up a loop with 12 beats, and cram in 5 hits. (Hint: three will be 2 beats apart and two will be 3. Divide, then distribute out the remainder.)

    The fun comes from running patterns with different rhythms against each other, though, and shifting them around in phase. So make multiple tracks with different lengths, and use the press-lower-left, turn-lower-right combo to adjust the phase. Done and done.

    (I think this introduction to polyrhythms is really what's driving people's response to the whole Euclidean thing, deep down.)

    IMO, the D isn't so limited as to need an explicit Euclidean function. The matrix is brilliant. If you want to limit yourself to evenly-distributed beats, go nuts. Simplicity is great!

    But when you want to do something fancier than Euclidean polyrhythms, it's easy too.

    Post edited by hexagon5un on
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