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Another cool looking grid based sequencer

1
darenagerdarenager Between a rack and a hardware placePosts: 164

Looks pretty interesting:

https://dadamachines.com/product/composer-pro/

€1300

Comments

  • 0
    pbolgerpbolger ChristchurchPosts: 61

    Although pretty limited compared to the Deluge:

    • 16 × MIDI/Audio tracks (Machines)
    • up to 12 Patterns per Machine
    • Up to 16 Bars per pattern

  • 0
    darenagerdarenager Between a rack and a hardware placePosts: 164

    Yeah quite different with a little overlap, not sure if I would get one as yet but not as a Deluge replacement anyway.

  • 1
    KlaustrophilKlaustrophil Posts: 59
    edited May 17

    @pbolger said:
    Although pretty limited compared to the Deluge:

    • 16 × MIDI/Audio tracks (Machines)
    • up to 12 Patterns per Machine
    • Up to 16 Bars per pattern

    Yup very limited. Except for the open source architecture (which is more powerful and is based on a Raspberry PI 3 and two Cortex M4 microprocessors as well as two small Lattice ICE40UP5K FPGAs) and software which can be modified and extended by everyone. And the proper display and the HDMI output and the bigger matrix and the touchpad and the clip matrix... Basically the Deluge Pro version. ;)

    Even though I will definitely buy this thing as soon as it's available, I might keep the Deluge. It's a bit smaller and more portable because of the integrated battery. It's more like a groovebox while the Composer Pro is meant to be the brain of the studio or a bigger live setup.

    Post edited by Klaustrophil on
  • 1
    punchedoutpunchedout United StatesPosts: 29

    I've been on the fence. The open source aspect is drawing me in, but I'm not as satisfied with the layout as I am with the deluge which seems more intuitive even though we don't have the nice screen.

    I don't really see a reason to upgrade to their version as a Deluge owner, but if I didn't own either device I would probably buy the other one just for the screen/open source aspect.

  • 0
    pbolgerpbolger ChristchurchPosts: 61

    Yup very limited. Except for the open source architecture (which is more powerful and is based on a Raspberry PI 3 and two Cortex M4 microprocessors as well as two small Lattice ICE40UP5K FPGAs) and software which can be modified and extended by everyone. And the proper display and the HDMI output and the bigger matrix and the touchpad and the clip matrix... Basically the Deluge Pro version. ;)

    Even though I will definitely buy this thing as soon as it's available, I might keep the Deluge. It's a bit smaller and more portable because of the integrated battery. It's more like a groovebox while the Composer Pro is meant to be the brain of the studio or a bigger live setup.

    On the other hand you can buy a copy of Live for half what this device costs, and it'll do everything it does and more.
    Buying the Composer Pro is a gamble, unless you are planning to develop the OS yourself: if it takes off it may well be the ultimate portable DAW. But there's every chance it won't. It's expensive, and it's not clear whether there's a gap in the market for a device like this at the moment.
    The Deluge is a great bet at the moment. Although development is closed source the developers are steaming ahead with new features nearly three years after it first launched. Sure it'd be nice to have contributions by other developers included, but I'm not convinced that diluting the Synthstrom vision and energy would improve on what's happening with the Deluge now.
    I'm committed to open source too, but I'm aware that 'open source' encompasses a wide range of development models, ranging from almost total anarchy through to highly corporatised projects where independent developers are used as cheap labour and given zero input into the direction of the project.
    If you really need the to be part of an open source music hardware project why not get into the OTTO project? It's pretty active, and the hardware would cost a fraction of the Composer Pro.

  • 0
    KlaustrophilKlaustrophil Posts: 59

    TL/DR; I just need a damn sequencer with a grid interface, clips and a user interface which doesn't suck. :/

    @pbolger said:
    On the other hand you can buy a copy of Live for half what this device costs, and it'll do everything it does and more.

    I might do that as soon as this software can be used without using a mouse and a keyboard. Not for a single operation. Just a (touch?) screen and the Push. BTW: Live + Push (978 EUR) + portable PC (maybe ~900 EUR) is not that cheap anymore.

    Buying the Composer Pro is a gamble, unless you are planning to develop the OS yourself: if it takes off it may well be the ultimate portable DAW. But there's every chance it won't. It's expensive, and it's not clear whether there's a gap in the market for a device like this at the moment.

    I'm indeed not sure for the demand on the market. I'm also pretty sure that the "high" (If you know a cheaper grid based sequencer please tell me more) price comes from the uncertain market situation. Time will tell. But for my part I'm willing to hack this device a bit to make it do what I want. BTW I don't want the ultimate portable DAW. I just need a good sequencer with a grid interface and clips.

    The Deluge is a great bet at the moment. Although development is closed source the developers are steaming ahead with new features nearly three years after it first launched. Sure it'd be nice to have contributions by other developers included, but I'm not convinced that diluting the Synthstrom vision and energy would improve on what's happening with the Deluge now.

    The energy behind this project is amazing and I don't know any other manufacturer in this market which supports a device in this way. Anyway, I really don't like some of the design decisions in the hardware and software.

    I'm committed to open source too, but I'm aware that 'open source' encompasses a wide range of development models, ranging from almost total anarchy through to highly corporatised projects where independent developers are used as cheap labour and given zero input into the direction of the project.

    Let's see how this will develop.

    If you really need the to be part of an open source music hardware project why not get into the OTTO project? It's pretty active, and the hardware would cost a fraction of the Composer Pro.

    This project is cool but I don't care at all since this is not a grid based sequencer.

  • 0
    amiga909amiga909 SwitzerlandPosts: 806
    edited May 20

    @darenager said:
    Yeah quite different with a little overlap, not sure if I would get one as yet but not as a Deluge replacement anyway.

    Yeah, talked to the dev at Superbooth, Dada machines are really nice folks. Wish them success.
    Wont be released before 2020 or even 2021. He told me they are looking into stuff you can actually do on the device. Just a Midi sequencer and placing audios won't make the deal, they need samplers, fx, maybe synths too. He told me they are looking into Orac Support (Organelle). Could also be a candidate for the new ELK Music OS, a OS that specializes in running cross platform VSTs (JUCE) and Reason Rack Extensions on embedded hardware. ELK doesnt seem to be open source though.

    @pbolger said:

    This project is cool but I don't care at all since this is not a grid based sequencer.

    Could become one, they are still in concept phase, asked for plans for a song/arranger views and the dev mentioned it might become launchpad/ableton style.

    Post edited by amiga909 on
  • 0
    KlaustrophilKlaustrophil Posts: 59

    @amiga909 said:
    Yeah, talked to the dev at Superbooth, Dada machines are really nice folks. Wish them success.
    Wont be released before 2020 or even 2021. He told me they are looking into stuff you can actually do on the device. Just a Midi sequencer and placing audios won't make the deal, they need samplers, fx, maybe synths too.

    I do not think so. There's no point in developing such kind of platform for years without a community. Remember how the Deluge project started - even as closed source project. Also, they told me something different which matches what they said the the YouTube video of Synth Anatomy.

    Could become one, they are still in concept phase, asked for plans for a song/arranger views and the dev mentioned it might become launchpad/ableton style.

    This would imply either a huge re-design of the hardware or deep support for a third party controller. Even if they might introduce that feature, this device is primarily a synthesizer/sampler which is not what I'm looking for.

  • 0
    amiga909amiga909 SwitzerlandPosts: 806

    @Klaustrophil apparently i dont know what ur vision for this type of gesr is. dont want to confuse what i am hoping for the ComposerPro and what your dream device would look like.
    You mentioned they told u something different? In regard to the arranger or 3th party software? He did mention Orac.

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